RoofScreen watertight attachment on commercial built up roof thumbnail for video.

Sixty-Five Thousand Successful Roof Attachments

If you avoid roof penetrations like the plague, you’re in good company. People are afraid of roof penetrations because of a long history of shoddy work and poor design in the construction and solar industries, which makes them leak. But let’s face it, roof penetrations are necessary and that’s where RoofScreen® can help you. 

Trust our track record of over sixty-five thousand successful roof attachments without a leak. We came out of the roofing and construction business so we get it. That’s why we developed and patented a roof penetration system that works for architects, building owners, contractors and roofers.  

 

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Rooftop equipment enclosures using steel tubing and stainless steel connectors.

Equipment Screens

One of the most common applications of our watertight roof attachments is rooftop equipment enclosures. For more information about our pre-designed roof screen systems, click the link below to jump to that page. 

Equipment Screens

 

Square Base with RotoLock™

The RoofScreen® patented square roof attachment system is designed to mount to various types of roof structures and adjust to the roof pitch with our ingenious RotoLockTM feature. The inside bottom plate of the Base Supports have pre-punched holes to accommodate different types of fasteners for wood, steel and concrete roof structures.

  • Small 6” x 6” footprint does not impede water flow and roof drainage. 
  • Multiple Base Support heights and extensions available to accommodate any roof insulation thickness. 
  • Fastens to roof structure through the inside of the Base Support and can be installed from above without needing to go inside the building. 
  • 100% stainless steel RotoLockTM adjusts for roof pitch and locks together to minimize torque at the roof connection. 
  • Integral flashing / counter-flashing keeps it water tight without the need for periodic maintenance. 

Click on the red Details button for more information and technical downloads. 

Technical Downloads

DATA SHEET PDF

Round Post with Slip-On Caps

The RoofScreen® Round Post Attachments with Slip-On Caps provide more flexibility for height because the Slip-On Cap and Roof Flashing Boot are independent of each other. 

  • Post is 2.5” round high strength steel.  
  • Slip-On Caps are 100% stainless steel. 
  • Adjustable sleeve can be any desired height. 
  • Fastens to roof structure through pre-punched holes in base plate and can be installed from above without needing to go inside the building. 
  • Works with standard round roof flashing boots.
  • Flashing boot secured to sleeve with draw band, sealant and neoprene storm collar. 

Click on the red Details button for more information and technical downloads. 

Technical Downloads

DATA SHEET PDF

Rooftop screen wall with aluminum louvers mounted on watertight sleeper caps.

DryCap™ Sleeper Cap System

DryCap™ is a watertight, structural sleeper cap system designed to cover wood or steel sleepers and curb rails on commercial roofs. Equipment can be mounted and attached to the T-slots on the DryCap™ without penetrating the watertight barrier.

  • Solves the problem of fasteners causing leaks in traditional sheet metal sleeper caps. 
  • Can be ordered to any length, or cut to fit in the field.
  • Mounts over 4x sleepers with room for roofing materials on each side. 
  • Mount any kind of equipment like pipes, HVAC or roof screens without penetrating the watertight barrier.

For a whole page full of information about our DryCap™ System, click here.

Flashings

RoofScreen offers several types of specially fitted roof flashing boots for proper waterproofing of our Roof Attachment Systems.  

Click on the red Details button for more information and technical downloads. 

  • Wood braces from a roof screen mounted in pitch pocket full of black tar.

    Compare to Pitch Pockets

    Pitch pockets, also called pitch pans, have been around since the dinosuars. And by modern roofing standards, they are dinosaurs. If you are unfamiliar with the term, a pitch pocket is essentially a pan filled with coal tar pitch to flow around a roof penetration to keep it from leaking. These days they are usually filled with higher quality chemicals, which is good, but this type of roof attachment and sealing system is inferior and requires constant maintenance to keep it water tight.

    For more information, please see our article titled Why Roof Penetrations Are Actually a Good Thing

  • Pipe penetration on commercial roof sealed with caulked and banded flashing.
    Pipe penetration on commercial roof sealed with caulked and banded flashing. Pipe penetration on commercial roof sealed with caulked and banded flashing. Pipe penetration on commercial roof sealed with caulked and banded flashing. Pipe penetration on commercial roof sealed with caulked and banded flashing. Pipe penetration on commercial roof sealed with caulked and banded flashing.

    Compare to Caulk and Band

    A common method of sealing a roof penetration is to wrap it with flashing material, caulk the top edge and clamp it with a hose clamp. This works pretty well on round pipe penetrations, but starts to really fall apart on square or odd shaped protrusions. If this method is used, it is essential to use an additional storm collar, sometimes called an umbrella flashing, above the caulking to protect it from the elements. While the caulk and band method is considered acceptable in the roofing industry, you should understand it requires regular maintenance to keep it from leaking. 

    For more information, please see our article titled Why Roof Penetrations Are Actually a Good Thing.

  • Air conditioners mounted to sleepers with sheet metal caps.
    Wood roof screen mounted to leaky sheet metal sleeper caps. Wood roof screen mounted to leaky sheet metal sleeper caps. Wood roof screen mounted to leaky sheet metal sleeper caps. Wood roof screen mounted to leaky sheet metal sleeper caps. Wood roof screen mounted to leaky sheet metal sleeper caps.

    Compare to Sleepers or Curb Rails

    People have been using wood or steel sleepers, sometimes call curb rails, to support equipment on roofs for many years. But that doesn’t mean it’s a good idea. The worst way to do it is to lay wood beams directly on the roof. That’s just asking for trouble. A better way to do it is to attach the sleeper to the structure, completely roof it in and cover it with a watertight sheet metal cap. The only problem with that method is the only way to fasten equipment to the sleeper is to pierce the watertight sheet metal cap. That’s one of the biggest mistakes we see in commercial roofing, but we do have a solution. It's called DryCap™, a sleeper cap system that allows equipment to be attached without piercing the watertight barrier. Check it out here: DryCap™

     

  • Equipment screen on a rooftop ballasted with its own weight and sitting on plywood pads.
    Satellite dish held down with concrete ballast blocks on commercial roof. Satellite dish held down with concrete ballast blocks on commercial roof. Satellite dish held down with concrete ballast blocks on commercial roof. Satellite dish held down with concrete ballast blocks on commercial roof. Satellite dish held down with concrete ballast blocks on commercial roof.

    Compare to Ballasted (non penetrating)

    If you search for mounting equipment to commercial roofs, you will find lots of manufacturers claiming “no roof penetrations” like it’s a good thing. Well it isn’t. Sorry, but we’re here to tell you the truth, and the truth is that ballasted equipment on a commercial roof can actually cause more problems with the roofing than properly installed penetrating systems. It’s a little too detailed to go into right here, but if you want to know more about it, please see our article titled Why Roof Penetrations Are Actually a Good Thing

  • Wood brace attached directly to built up roofing with dry rot.
    Wood roof screen with foam roofing sprayed on the roof attachments. Wood roof screen with foam roofing sprayed on the roof attachments. Wood roof screen with foam roofing sprayed on the roof attachments. Wood roof screen with foam roofing sprayed on the roof attachments. Wood roof screen with foam roofing sprayed on the roof attachments.

    Compare to Attaching Wood Directly To the Roof Deck

    Okay, this one's just for fun. We know you'd never do this, right?

    Actually, you may be surprised how many times this has been done in the past. We have hundreds of pictures like this. The problem is allowing workers who have no roofing expertise to attach anything to the roof. Any roof penetration should be approved and roofed by a professional roofing contractor. They should also be pre-approved by the manufacturer of the roofing system to ensure compliance with the warranty. It's not hard to see why so many architects, builders and building owners are petrified of roof penetrations.  

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